The Civil Society Strategy: One Year On

A View from the National Council for Voluntary Organisations (NCVO)

Last August the government published its civil society strategy. One year on Elizabeth Chamberlain, Head of Policy and Public Services at NCVO, looks at what’s happened, whether any progress has been made, and what effect Brexit and changes in ministers have had.

Since its publication last summer, we’ve seen changes in the ministers in charge of civil society policy, as well as a necessary focus on all the departments’ resources and capacity on preparing for Brexit, most urgently for the event of no deal. And politically, as of last month we have a new government in charge.

All this has inevitably meant that the impetus that was initially behind the strategy, as well as its ambitions of setting a roadmap for the future of civil society, has somewhat been lost along the way.

But has this really been noticed? Are charities up and down the country asking themselves ‘what is happening with the civil society strategy?’.

Read the full article…

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Labour promises more grant funding and time off for trustees

Labour

According to http://www.thirdsector.co.uk, the civil society strategy, From Paternalism to Participation, published today says that:

Labour would increase grant funding to charities, allow trustees to take time off work and give local communities greater control over decisions, according to the party’s long-awaited civil society strategy.

The article also states that:

Labour pledges to reverse the decline in the number of community spaces. The document says the Conservative government has closed down 400 day centres, 500 public libraries, 600 youth centres and 1,000 children’s centres since it took power in 2010.

It goes on to say that:

Charity trustees would also receive equal status in law to that of school governors and councillors, allowing them to take time off to carry out their duties, the document says.

and,

The document reiterates Labour’s commitment to repeal the controversial lobbying act, which the sector has argued stifles its ability to campaign freely.

It says instead that the act would be replaced with a Community Empowerment Charter that encourages civil society organisations to campaign.

Read the rest of the article here…